#3 East Johor- Sedili Wetlands

The Sedili Wetlands are located in  Sedli Kecil, south of Tanjung Sutera which I’ve been writing about here and here.  I was so lucky to have seen this place- because it is a rare and unique wetland- a freshwater swamp forest. Freshwater mangrove swamps are endangered in South-East Asia due to agriculture and village settlements. What is remaining here is just small pockets of freshwater swamp forests and the river vegetation.

We went during the Hari-Raya holidays, so it was very lonely in the village, and the boatmen and villagers were off to the city. We did our own exploration- and was an amazing experience!

The water was a brilliant sea-green color, and reflected the clouds and sky beautifully.

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There were many Pacific Swallows  (Hirundo tahitica) that were gliding around near the water. Here’s one that looked at us curiously.

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We went through the mangrove forest using the wetland boardwalk.

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This Yellow-Barred Flutterer (Rhyothemis phyllis) was flying all around the boardwalk. It often hovered in the air in one place for long:

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Yellow-Barred Flutterer
Rhyothemis phyllis

This rich, mangrove forest was absolutely beautiful, calm and serene. The forest air was filled with the rustle of leaves and the insects chirping. We saw crabs scuttling around the mangrove trees. It is extremely sad that this beautiful forest is endangered. The Sedili Wetlands provide a home for 42 true mangrove species,and 34 mangrove-associated species. Mangroves are excellent habitats for many species, but also protect the area from floods, tsunamis, etc. Even though there is a project to protect the Sedili Wetlands, there was a lot of maintenance that needed to be done- as half the boardwalk was broken, and the signs were too.

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When we exited the boardwalk we saw a beautiful Black Veined Tiger (Danaus melanippus):

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Black Veined Tiger
Danaus melanippus

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A Blue Veined Tiger (Ideopsis vulgaris macrina):

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Blue Glassy Tiger
Ideopsis vulgaris macrina

 

A Common Tiger (Danaus genutia):

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Common Tiger
Danaus genutia

After the boardwalk we decided to go on a small lookout point-which was very shaky and broken near the highway. We got a nice view of the sea, mangrove trees and caught a glimpse of a Stork-billed Kingfisher and herons. I liked this ant nest which was stuck together by some sort of glue produced by the ant.

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On the main road we saw many sunbird nests in the bouganvillea flowers:

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That was the end of our visit to the Sedili Wetlands. I hope this freshwater mangrove forest and all the others will be preserved and protected, for it is a very important source of raw materials, water and habitats for wildlife.

FURTHER READING (I read these for references) 

Wetlands International

Wildsingapore news

Green Kampong- The Sedili Wetlands

Thanks for reading!

Lavanya Prakash

Blog- https://mynatureexperiences.wordpress.com/
Twitter- https://twitter.com/MyNatureExp
Facebook page- Mynatureexperiences
Email- mynatureexperiences(at)hotmail.com

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2 thoughts on “#3 East Johor- Sedili Wetlands

  1. Hi Lavanya. This is Deepa, your neighbour. I loved your blog, and your writing style. There is a simplicity and sincerity that is very refreshing. Hold on to it as you grow up!! best, Deepa

    1. Hi Deepa Aunty, Thank you so much for visiting my blog and for your kind words. I will be adding a section with tips which is child-friendly for each park as you suggested! Thanks again 🙂

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