#14 Admiralty Park

Admiralty Park is a 20 ha park with over 100 species of flora and fauna. It sits on a hilly terrain with the river Sungei Cina flowing through it. It is full of different biodiversity and ecosystems, with a mix of mangroves, riverine, grasslands and secondary rainforest. I was contemplating about whether to write this post as I did not spot much fauna and the mangrove boardwalk was closed.

As I browsed through my pictures several times, it hit me that I forgot about the flora. Trees and plants are so important for an ecosystem.  They provide us with the fresh oxygen that we breathe in everyday, the flowers and fruits they bear are food for the insects and birds, the roots hold the soil together and prevent rain water from washing the soil away. It soon struck me.. that a tree or plant is as extravagant and beautiful as a bird or a butterfly. Now, I look at nature around me in a totally different way.

The flora at Admiralty park is really fascinating and I invite you to go there and look out for some awesome plants! This walking trail guide gives an overview of everything you may see there.

We entered the park from the West Entrance. The pond glistened invitingly and dragonflies buzzed around.

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There was an interesting sign board and a bunch of attractive plants. I soon found out that it was a ‘rain garden’ and had been planted to prevent storm water from picking up unwanted sediments and making the water appear polluted. Plants in the rain garden include the Miagos bushOsmoxylon lineare),  Pandan  (Pandanus amaryllifolius), Vertiver  (Chrysopogon zizanioides) and Purple Fountain Grass (Pennisetum x advena )All these plants help to improve water quality as they are aquatic plants. Do read the short descriptions on each plant at the rain garden if you visit!

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I found the Purple Fountain Grass to be very beautiful. It was a dark, deep burgundy-red coloured grass, and is quick and easy to grow. It was a smart choice because not only does it act as a decorative feature, but it offers good soil erosion control on embankments.

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Purple Fountain Grass
Pennisetum x advena 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Simpoh Air (Dillenia suffruticosa), a large shrub commonly seen in Singapore has pretty yellow flowers and star shaped fruits. I even have one in my rooftop garden. The birds love it!

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Simpoh Air
Dillenia suffruticosa

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On our way to the boardwalk, there was a Common Yellow Stem Fig (Ficus fistulosa), of course with its round fruits that feed mammals and insects.

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Common Yellow Stem Fig
Ficus fistulosa

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A Peacock Pansy ( Junonia almana) with torn wings fluttered around nearby…

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Peacock Pansy
Junonia almana

The first part of the boardwalk offered some views of the Sungei Cina:

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A walk through the secondary rainforest:

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This is Wild Ginger (Cheilocostus speciosus) is a close relative of ginger and banana. It can be found in the forest floor of tropical rainforests, as well as along riverbanks. The white flower had bloomed and looked stunning against the red ginger.

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Wild Ginger
Cheilocostus speciosus

We came out of the forest to the open grassland. We saw the Nipa Palm (Nypa fruticans) that was huge! It’s seeds, known as the ‘Attap Chee’ are used in a local dessert called the Ice kachang. They have become quite rare in Singapore as they are mangrove dwelling palms, and most of the mangroves have been cleared in Singapore.

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Nipa Palm
Nypa fruticans

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There were many dragonflies flying around the grasslands. This is the Common Parasol (Neurothemis fluctuans)

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Common Parasol
Neurothemis fluctuans

I gasped in shock as I noticed this damselfly was near the Blue Dasher (Brachydiplax chalybea) while I looked through the pictures at home! I loved this little fellow with its beady green eyes and its orange tail. If only I had noticed it then I would have taken a better picture! What a pleasant surprise 🙂 This seems to be the Orange-Tailed Marsh Dart (Ceriagrion cerinorubellum) which is a common species in Singapore.

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Orange-Tailed Marsh Dart
Ceriagrion cerinorubellum

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Blue Dasher
Brachydiplax chalybea

I found this leaf with these weird looking things behind it… it was quite pretty! Do tell me if you know what it is.

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We soon came to know that sadly the Mangrove boardwalk is closed till 31st December for maintenance. We’ll go back again!

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A Chocolate Pansy ( Junonia hedonia ida) bid us goodbye and that was the end of our trip.

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Chocolate Pansy
Junonia hedonia ida

I hope you enjoyed the post and learnt some new things! I learnt a lot while researching and observing…Nature is really our best teacher.

TIPS FOR ADMIRALTY PARK

When to go: Early morning in the weekends when there is little crowd

What to bring: Binoculars, your camera, water bottles and snacks

What to do: Follow the path through 3 bridges that will take you through the diverse ecosystems.

What to wear: Comfortable clothes, preferably cotton and lightweight and trekking/jogging shoes

Walking time:  1-2 hours

What to look out for : In the grassland, look out for butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies near the streams and ponds. Listen out for the Long-tailed Shrike, Baya Weaver Paddyfield Pippit and Zitting Cisticola in the forest. Keep your eyes open for interesting flora like the Hedgehog Rattan, Oil Palm, Common Kelat, and Australian Mulberry tree.

How to get there: Woodlands MRT Station/Bus Interchange is  15 minutes away from the park

Address:

Admiralty Park

31 Riverside Road

Singapore 739089

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Lavanya Prakash

Blog- https://mynatureexperiences.wordpress.com/
Twitter- https://twitter.com/MyNatureExp
Facebook page- Mynatureexperiences
Email- mynatureexperiences(at)hotmail.com

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5 thoughts on “#14 Admiralty Park

  1. I always enjoy reading your blog Lavana, so thank you for taking the trouble to share your infectious passion! The weird looking things on the leaf are some kind of gall. They take many forms but are identifiable to their cause, which ranges from insects to fungi, bacteria & even viruses apparently. No idea how many there are in SG (I’ve seen a fair few on my walks) but the book of UK plant galls is VERY thick! Fascinating things that always make me want to more, but I rarely get round to discovering the cause of each.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gall

    All the best,

    Craig

    1. Thank you so much for reading my blog! The information about the gall is quite interesting! Thanks again 🙂 -Lavanya

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